A young friend of Mrs. Marioka had enlisted in the Army and returned to camp after training to say goodbye to friends and family. He had been an "A" student and president of many organizations at UCLA before the evacuation. He was going overseas to join the 442nd to serve his country. He felt he could make a difference. He was one of the many casualties that the 442nd and the 100 th battalions suffered during the war.

Many of the Hawaiian Japanese of the 100 th battalion found it difficult to believe that the Japanese Americans on the mainland were in concentration camps and with them fighting for the same country that incarcerated them.

 

 When Lani Sanjek showed me this family album photo it made me realize that families saved photos of this time period and shared them with their children. Although most of the photographs are of family and friends, there seem to be some that create exceptional irony.

This is the father/daughter portrait in front of the guard tower of the camp. Many other photographers show the barbed wire fense or the guard tower as part of the portrait.

This is little Lani Morioka dressed for the walk to the group showers.