Publications like this one, Camp Tule Lake Guardsman Magazine, May 1945 issue, would have articles about the life of the families who were guards in the camp, including curious articles about how to understand the Japanese Americans. This issue is from the Tule Lake Museum on the fair grounds.

 
 Professional photographers took panoramic photographs of special occurances such as this scene of the arrival of a second or third group of internees fresh off the trains from assembly centers (race tracks). Transience and dislocation was part of the everyday life of the internees. Families were separated and moved to other camps several times.

 

 Sometimes Life Magazine would send their photographers into the internment camps to show life in the camps trying to show the government as a "caretaker" institution.

This is Mr. Ed Akiya playing the guitar and his family in their section of the typical barrack and the family that had to live there.

 

 View of Granada (Amache) Relocation Camp from the guard tower and fense surrounding the camp. Notice the continuation of the fense on the left picture.

 

 Post cards were made of each camp, even the camps in Canada had aerial views like this made into post cards. These were sold in the camps to the internees of this very coveted veiw from the outside looking in.